10 days in Maui – Part II

Maui is the second largest of the Hawaiian Islands and is often referred to as the Valley Isle. This refers to the flat bridge of land between the two volcanoes that make up the island: Haleakala to the east and the West Maui mountains to the west. With miles of sandy beaches, lush green jungles, and rugged volcanic landscapes, Maui offers a wide range of activities on land and in the water.

10 days in Maui – Part I

Maui is the second largest of the Hawaiian Islands and is often referred to as the Valley Isle. This refers to the flat bridge of land between the two volcanoes that make up the island: Haleakala to the east and the West Maui mountains to the west. With miles of sandy beaches, lush green jungles, and rugged volcanic landscapes, Maui offers a wide range of activities on land and in the water.

Sliding Sands

Starting at an elevation of 10,000ft, this trail winds down to the crater floor, providing views of cinder cones and a volcanic landscape.

Haleakalā National Park

Haleakalā National Park was named after Haleakalā, a dormant shield volcano that forms more than three quarters of Maui. The park consists of two distinct areas: the summit district high up in the mountains (or rather, volcano), and the Kīpahulu district located along the coast. The landscape (and temperature) difference between the two areas is also very extreme, making for a unique hiking experience in both areas of the park.